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Simple ideas to help you go flying.

Started by tsr, January 10, 2015, 15:11:34 pm

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tsr

January 10, 2015, 15:11:34 pm Last Edit: January 10, 2015, 23:21:31 pm by tsr
This is intended as a collection of simple ideas to help a beginner go flying. It is especially aimed at those teaching themselves. Otherwise your instructor will be guiding you and some of these ideas will be redundant.

Simulators: these will not teach you how to fly but they will teach you some really important things. Primarily what each control does, one key one is when the model is flying towards you move the stick towards the wing you want to lift and when flying away move the stick towards the way you want to turn. They also teach that you apply control until you reach the angle of bank you want then move the stick back to the centre and then when you have turned to the heading you want you move the stick to level the wings.

Models; moderately to very stable and will fly slowly, if it does this then it will work for you. To my mind it will have a propeller that is not easily damaged so a pusher or high mounted prop and will be easy to repair or have replacement parts that are cheap and available. If you join a club your instructor will guide you on which model and radio.

Flying ground; the bigger the better and remember when you are a beginner trees have a magnetism for RC Models so keep well away from them or better still don't have any where you are learning to fly.

Wind; fly when it isn't blowing until you can fly without thinking about the aircraft or can fly "ahead of the plane." Then you can fly in some wind and eventually in windy conditions. If you have to try it then keep your model upwind of where you are standing.

Orientation; Everybody will have this problem from time to time when you begin it is even worse. So try and fly in good light and have your model one colour on the top and another underneath. Light and dark ideally.

Plan; I found learning to have a plan about where I wanted the model to go and what I would be doing on each circuit really helped me to develop my flying. Suddenly you know when to turn, where to head to next and what you were going to do on each leg. After the flight think about what went well what didn't. Then think about the how to improve next time.

Controls these are like any other steering system you use. You do not need to move them all the way or return them quickly. Move the controls a little bit at a time this should help you fly more accurately and centre them just as slowly. It will also put less stress on the aeroplane. Before you fly make sure that all control surfaces move the right way and move easily and freely. If they don't correct the fault before you fly.

Do not fly for too long to start with 5- 10 minutes is plenty then land relax and then have another flight. Concentration over long periods is difficult.

How high, I tend to think about two trees high so 20-30 metres this gives you a chance to recover if you make a mistake.

If it all goes wrong; shut the throttle hands off the sticks look at the model and then do what you need to do to get it gliding slightly nose down. Then decide to recover, land.

Good luck and if you have questions ask them before you fly. Afterwards might be too late.

If any one has other ideas or if you feel I need to change anything above  please add them.
Any landing you can walk away from is a good one.
You may need a box of tissues though!

itsme

One of the commonest problems I see is becoming so engrossed in watching the model that you fail to see where it is going. Make a point of having a glance around to get your position from the model and avoid tunnel vision, which can finish with model becoming a dot in the sky. Just a quick glance around gets your bearings, and you will be more in charge. Also, before launching, plan where you are going to land, (preferably into wind) and ensure there is plenty of room.

half throttle

Quote from: bobt on January 10, 2015, 15:35:57 pm
One of the commonest problems I see is becoming so engrossed in watching the model that you fail to see where it is going. Make a point of having a glance around to get your position from the model and avoid tunnel vision, which can finish with model becoming a dot in the sky. Just a quick glance around gets your bearings, and you will be more in charge. Also, before launching, plan where you are going to land, (preferably into wind) and ensure there is plenty of room.


Daft as it seems, you can also not notice where the ground is!  :embarassed:  :'(
'Concerning myself with the reasoning processes of your cerebral cortex is notably absent from my tables of consideration at this juncture'

Phil_G

Phils tips: scrounge rubber bands from the postman
Take a folding stool and a flask of coffee.
Do a checklist before setting off - wings, fusses, trannies, fuel/batteries, fieldbox etc
Dont let yourself get uptight -  remember its just a hobby!




mike557


tsr

January 13, 2015, 07:15:10 am #5 Last Edit: January 13, 2015, 07:17:24 am by tsr
If you have a foam type plane then here is useful tip if you crash or even if you put a ding in a leading edge or in the fuselage.http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vdaYmuLGei8 not my video but one that shows the principal well.
Any landing you can walk away from is a good one.
You may need a box of tissues though!

Nordsee

Another one from me. When I learnt to fly a very long time ago, my Instructer ( who was lightening fast at grabbing the Tx when everything went wrong, no Buddy boxes then. Are you still about Ron??) told me to give a commentary of intended movements and Actions. Very helpful when landing, I found. Used the same technique( but mumbled quietly) when I learnt full size Gliding.