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New World Record.

Started by Anthony, November 23, 2014, 10:39:44 am

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Anthony

Bruce Tebo does 505mph with his K130, check the vid on rcgroup, can't even see the glider. Ant.

The Saint. (Owen)

Electrickery is the work of the devil.
Proper aeroplanes are powered by engines.


Michael_Rolls

Interesting video - I presume that there is actually a model in it? Damned if I could see it. Still - 505 mph with a model glider - incredible!
Mike
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

SteveBB

Quote from: Michael_Rolls on November 23, 2014, 11:27:45 am
Interesting video - I presume that there is actually a model in it? Damned if I could see it. Still - 505 mph with a model glider - incredible!
Mike



Propellers add drag. As do turbines. :study:
Rimmer: Step up to Red Alert!
Kryten: Sir, are you absolutely sure? It does mean changing the bulb.

deckit

So, the magic 500 captured on radar at last; fantastic!

In spite of the background windnoise, the big Kinetic appears to have been remarkably quiet at those speeds which, if correct, suggests it might be capable of yet more.

And the new K2m record is surely at least an equivalent achievement.

Short odds on Spencer spending more time at the ridges quite soon..........

Q: If a plane passes through a dust cloud at 500 mph, does the paintwork get stripped-off?





Michael_Rolls

Can  do - just look at pictures of a/c that fought in the Western Desert in WW2, with leading edges and prop blades showing sand blasting effects.
Mike (and they weren't doing 500, although some of the prop blades may have been at the tips)
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

Phil_G

November 23, 2014, 16:32:19 pm #7 Last Edit: November 23, 2014, 16:39:10 pm by Phil_G
[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=1]

Michael_Rolls

Thanks - I can just make it out now
Mike
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

cambrad

Insane speed for a model glider, how much faster can they go before seeing the model is the biggest problem?
If you told the average man in the street that a model had gone over 500mph using nothing but wind for propulsion, he would think you had been smoking something dodgy.
Amazing acheivement.

Cactus

it's help if the cameraman put the thing on infinity and stopped bloody moving it about!
I know you believe you understand what you think i said, but i am not sure you realise that what you think you heard is not what i meant.

TrainPaul

A monumental achievement in model aircraft design, construction and flying skill. I'm sure a Mr R J Mitchell or Kelly Johnson would take there hats off in amazement!.

w8racer

Time to get the old Veron Impala out and give it a go  ;)
Robert Welford

Michael_Rolls

I've read about how DS works several times and I still can't really understand it - on the face of to an ignoramus like me it seems to fly in the face of 'energy can neither be created nor destroyed' (something else I've never really understood)
Mike
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

deckit

Quote from: Michael_Rolls on November 24, 2014, 19:26:17 pm
I've read about how DS works several times and I still can't really understand it - on the face of to an ignoramus like me it seems to fly in the face of 'energy can neither be created nor destroyed' (something else I've never really understood)
Mike


Flying in the face of Newton was my reason also for being perplexed by the phenomenon when we first encountered it.

Yet the explanation is extraordinarily simple once recognized. Plane carves round the backside in still air with, say, an airspeed of 100 mph.
The airflow above the shear is 25 mph. The moment the plane punches through the shear layer its airspeed immediately  becomes (with some loss due to the plane's wing not encountering the airflow at 90 degrees) say 120 mph. Further gain on the downleg exit through the shear & some relatively modest losses from friction/drag.
Plane knows nothing of the ground until it lands, but meanwhile we've enjoyed observing it achieving ground speeds far greater than anything achievable in any frontside dive.
Not magic, but magical. :af